Chow Mien

Ni hao! Who’s up for a Chinese foodie today? “Me, me, me!” “Me. Want that!” “Yes! Is it Chow Mein? And what’s Ni hao? Is it Japanese?” No problem guys! Just chill, OK? We'll have it later. And yes, you're right, Chow Mein for our tummies today, friends! And no, ‘Ni hao’ is a Chinese greeting that means ‘Hello’. OK, we're going to experience this Chinese food later. For now, before the ‘long life’ journey begins, let us discover the famous Chow Mein first. Alright?

Chow Mein is a stir-fried, Chinese-style noodles mixed with shredded meat or sometimes seafood, and vegetables. *stomach growls* Oops! Sorry. Well, Chow Mein is very popular in the entire Chinese Diaspora and is always included in the menus of Chinese restaurants. It is also popular in the United States and India. The word ‘Chow Mein’ is a Mandarin Chinese. ‘Chow’ means fried while ‘Mein’ means noodles. Chow Mein can be cooked using different types of noodles including wide or thin noodles, noodle pieces and vegetables like carrots, onion, cabbage, green pepper, garlic sprouts and mushrooms.

The American Chinese cuisine’s Chow Mein consists of noodles, meat (mostly pork), onions and celery. And hey guys! Do you know the most unusual ways of serving Chow Mein in America? The Hot Sandwich. It is a Chow Mein Sandwich consists of a “brown gravy based Chow Mein mixture placed on a hamburger bun and served hot.” In Indian Chinese Cuisine, Chow Mein is introduced by the Chinese of Calcutta and is usually served Hakka or with gravy. Chow Mein also has an Indian variant: the Vegetable Chow Mein. It consists of noodles with cabbage, bamboo shoots, pea pods, green peppers, and carrots.

OK, let’s do this! The journey to a ‘long life’ starts now! *winks*

Now it is time for you to enjoy! You can view the link to the recipe on "Life in the Lofthouse" website below.

Learn MORE / Get RECIPE at LIfe in the LOFTHOUSE


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